India Hotel’s Feel Wall Street’s Effects

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Congress Calls in the Spin Doctors

first_imgThe party has engaged U.S.-headquartered Burson-Marsteller, the public relations firm that represented American pop star Lady Gaga. Related Itemslast_img

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Holy Sites May Offer Clues to Antibiotic Resistance

first_imgThe Hindu holy sites in the Indian cities of Rishikesh and Haridwar attract millions of pilgrims each year – but they are now the destination for another group of devotees. Related Itemslast_img

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Surge in Number of Indian Students in Australia

first_imgThere are currently 35,000 Indian students in Australia and the numbers are growing rapidly. Related Itemslast_img

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This Indian Firm Has Most American Recruits

first_imgUS Secretary of State John Kerry has praised the Tata group for creating thousands of jobs in the United States. Related Itemslast_img

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Indian Cricket Legends Reunite With BCCI

first_imgTendulkar, Ganguly and Laxman to join forces in advisory roles for Indian cricket. Related Itemslast_img

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India Averts Being Clubbed as South Asia

first_imgProtests by Indians averted an attempt by certain Left-leaning academicians and scholars to dissolve India’s unique identity under a larger South Asian one in US school text books. Related Itemslast_img

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India Susceptible to Zika Outbreak

first_imgIndia, with 1.2billion residents in a potential Zika virus transmission area, and a large number of travellers from countries affected by the disease, could be the next country susceptible to the virus Related Itemslast_img

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Obama announces nominees for NSF deputy director, head of DOE Office of Science

first_imgThe White House announced today that President Barack Obama has nominated engineer Richard Buckius, currently the National Science Foundation’s (NSF’s) chief operating officer, to fill the agency’s second highest position: deputy director.Obama also tapped physicist Cherry Murray of Harvard University to become the head of the Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Office of Science, which oversees a $5 billion physical science research portfolio.Murray’s nomination follows the failure of the U.S. Senate to act on Obama’s 2013 pick for the Office of Science post, physicist Marc Kastner of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge. This past February, Kastner became the first president of the Science Philanthropy Alliance, a new research philanthropy.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Buckius has served as chief operating officer at NSF since October 2014, according to a White House statement, and senior science adviser since June 2014. He also served as assistant director of NSF’s engineering directorate from 2006 to 2008, and led an NSF division on chemical and transport systems from 2004 to 2005. Since 2008, he’s been a professor of mechanical engineering at Purdue University in Lafayette, Indiana, where he has also served as a vice president for research. Buckius received his Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley.Murray was dean of Harvard’s School of Engineering and Applied Sciences from 2009 to 2014. She has past DOE experience, having served as a top science administrator at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California from 2004 to 2009. Murray also held numerous positions at Bell Laboratories and its predecessors from 1978 to 2004. Murray earned her Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and was awarded the National Medal of Technology and Innovation by the White House in 2014.last_img read more

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Top stories: A new history of dog domestication, microbe-linked solar panels, and a project to build the human genome from scratch

first_imgDogs may have been domesticated more than onceFor years, scientists have debated where dogs came from. Did wolves first forge their special relationship with humans in Europe or in Asia? The answer, according to a new study, is yes. This week in Science, researchers report that genetic analysis of hundreds of canines reveals that dogs may have been domesticated twice, once in Asia and once in Europe or the Near East, although European ancestry has mostly vanished from today’s dogs. The findings could resolve a rift that has roiled the canine origins community—but the case isn’t closed yet.Scientists reveal proposal to build human genome from scratchSign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Last year, researchers working to synthesize the genome of a strain of yeast began to eye a much bigger prize: assembling from scratch the 3 billion base pairs of DNA that drive a human cell. The idea caught the attention of other prominent scientists, and inspired a proposal published online in Science this week. The so-called Human Genome Project–Write aims to synthesize entire genomes from their chemical components and get them to function in living cells.Microbe-linked solar panels are better than plants at converting sunlight to energyPlants are exceptional sunlight sponges. But they store only about 1% of the energy they soak up, locking it into the sugars and other organic molecules they use to build their cells. Scientists have boosted that number by a few percentage points. But now, researchers have taken a more sizable jump with solar panels, creating a hybrid device that uses a combination of catalysts and microbes to convert 10% of the captured solar energy into liquid fuels and other commodity chemicals.U.K. government isn’t tracking policy-related researchGovernment agencies in the United Kingdom do a poor job of keeping tabs on the research they fund to set policies, according to a report released this week by Sense About Science, a London-based group that advocates for the use of scientific evidence in policymaking. The report also described examples of delays in releasing the results of what it called “politically awkward” studies.‘Landmark study’ solves mystery behind classic evolution storyThe story of the peppered moth is a classic example of evolution in action: As coal soot and smoke blackened the trees of industrial England in the late 1800s, a rare, dark variant of the peppered moth flourished, quickly supplanting its white peers by blending in with the newly darkened tree bark. But despite decades of research, scientists didn’t know the exact mutation responsible for the once-unusual dark wings. Now, two studies pinpoint the location and identity of the gene mutation—and reveal that the same gene also controls the colorful patterns in some butterfly wings.Now that you’ve got the scoop on this week’s hottest Science news, come back Monday to test your smarts on our weekly quiz!last_img read more

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French scientists oppose nominee to head agricultural research institute

first_imgFrench scientists are sharply criticizing the nomination of a policy specialist to become the new president of the French National Institute for Agricultural Research (INRA).  The critics say nominee Philippe Mauguin, a senior official in France’s agriculture ministry, knows little about research and was offered the job as a political favor ahead of next year’s general elections. Mauguin was competing for the post against outgoing INRA President François Houllier, a former researcher.“We, INRA members of staff and associated members, protest against the possible parachuting of a political figure external to the world of research at the head of our Institute,” reads an online petition launched 5 July by a collective called @INRAlerte. The petition has so far gathered more than 2300 signatures. On 1 July, as Mauguin and Houllier were being interviewed for the post by an expert committee, the collective released a 30-page statement to the press demanding that government officials withdraw Mauguin’s application “because science is not a political reward.”Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Mauguin, who has served as chief of staff at the agriculture ministry since 2012, has spent his career working on agricultural policy at a number of public agencies. Many signers of the petition see Mauguin as a poor fit to lead INRA because he doesn’t hold a Ph.D.Others, meanwhile, praise Houllier, citing his 30-year research career and performance as INRA president. Houllier had done a “remarkable job at the helm of INRA,” which “makes the decision to replace him difficult to understand,” wrote Frédéric Dardel, the chair of INRA’s scientific council, in an open letter yesterday. Dardel announced that he was resigning from the council to protest Mauguin’s nomination.The nomination, @INRAlerte alleges, is the result of a political deal made years ago between Mauguin and agriculture minister Stéphane Le Foll. In its 30-page statement, the collective details allegations of political machinations that led to delays in the selection process and pressure on Houllier to accept alternative posts. @INRAlerte also argues the process was rife with conflicts of interest, because the agriculture ministry oversees the selection process, together with the ministry of higher education and research.Le Foll defended the nomination in the French Parliament yesterday, saying that “many chiefs of staff have been nominated to lead research institutions.” He also called the accusations of conflict of interest “a lie.” On 5 July, in a tweet, Le Foll wrote that the selection process was “transparent” and “will go all the way to completion.”The French Parliament must still approve Mauguin’s appointment to the 4-year INRA presidency, which is expected to begin on 26 July. If that happens, @INRAlerte says it will ask France’s supreme court to block the appointment. There is still time, the group said in a statement, “to oppose a nomination that is dangerous for French research, its credibility and its international recognition.”last_img read more

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How science fares in the U.S. budget deal

first_img NOAA research office receives 3.5% increase as agency gets overall 1% cutThe deal funds the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) at $5.7 billion, a decrease of 1% from 2016.This cut does not, however, target the agency’s Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research, which supports critical climate change research across the country. Indeed, the office’s budget will increase, by 3.5%, from $462 million to $478 million.The deal funds NOAA’s Sea Grant program, which supports research at colleges across the country, at $63 million, along with a separate $9.5 million line item for marine aquaculture, which is managed by Sea Grant; taken together, these come close to matching the $73 million appropriated in 2016. The office, which is a target for elimination in the Trump administration’s 2018 budget, would also see its support for stock assessments of red snapper in the Gulf of Mexico, funded at $10 million, moved to the National Marine Fisheries Service, the law notes, making the funding to Sea Grant “effectively above the fiscal year 2016 level.”Taking a large hit is NOAA’s National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service, which sees its budget drop by 6%, from $2.3 billion to $2.2 billion. Targeted in particular is COSMIC-2, a proposed constellation of 12 satellites developed in conjunction with Taiwan, which would use GPS radio occultation, a technique that harvests GPS signals deflected by Earth’s atmosphere to infer temperature, pressure, and humidity. The first six satellites are set for launch later this year, but the deal does not include financing for sensors for the second round of satellites, and orders NASA to evaluate within 90 days the potential to acquire similar data from commercial startups like Spire Global and GeoOptics, who have pioneered using small satellites to acquire similar data, and began providing such data to NOAA for evaluation last year.The law, meanwhile, maintains full support for NOAA’s troubled $11.3 billion Joint Polar Satellite System, a series of two advanced weather satellites, the first of which is set for launch late this summer, and its $11.3 billion line of four new geostationary satellites, the first of which, GOES-16, launched late last year. —Paul Voosen Small increase for Census Bureau hampers plans for 2020 countThe spending bill gives the U.S. Census Bureau three options to prepare for the next national census—and lobbyists say none of them is attractive.On paper, the bureau’s $100 million increase, to $1.47 billion, looks generous. But the Obama administration had requested $1.63 billion because the decennial head count in 2020 requires a huge spending ramp-up starting this year. And what congressional leaders have agreed on falls far short of what’s needed to do the job right and hold down costs, says Phil Sparks, a former Census official who is now co-director of The Census Project in Washington, D.C.“One option is to revert to the pen and pencil census” used in 2010 instead of the increased reliance on electronic data gathering, Sparks says. But that will cost an additional $5 billion, he notes—all the savings that Census officials have promised to deliver. “The second option is to cut back on other surveys that the Census Bureau conducts, including the ongoing American Community Survey and this year’s National Economic Census [conducted every 5 years]. The third option is to cut the end-to-end test planned for next year” to make sure all of the many elements are working smoothly.The Census Bureau could limp along on a tight 2017 budget if it were assured a big increase in 2018, Sparks says, but Trump’s preliminary budget for 2018 has proposed flat funding. “That’s more than disappointing,” Sparks says. “It’s totally inadequate. And if it comes to pass, we’re headed toward the possibility of a 2020 census that is not fair and not accurate.” —Jeffrey Mervis For FDA, modest support on precision medicine effort, and a prod on lab test regulationThe $2.76 billion included for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is roughly in line with Obama’s $2.74 billion request, which kept the agency’s funding roughly flat over 2016. The numbers don’t include anticipated user fees, collected from companies submitting products for FDA review.All told, the bill means the agency gets a nearly $70 million increase over 2016, when new budget authority, previously approved funding to implement the 21st Century Cures Act passed in December 2016, and an extra $10 million to combat Zika and other emerging threats is included, Steven Grossman, deputy executive director at the Alliance for a Stronger FDA in Washington, D.C., noted in a statement.The bill directs $2.5 million to Obama’s Precision Medicine Initiative, which falls short of the requested $4.4 million intended to establish a clinical data collection system to better match medical devices with patients that would benefit from them.And it makes no mention of $75 million in proposed FDA support for Biden’s cancer moonshot effort. In January, the agency launched an Oncology Center of Excellence, as proposed in the President’s request, to advise the National Cancer Institute on the development of new cancer treatments.The bill “strongly urges” the agency to continue its work on plans to regulate laboratory-developed tests. These diagnostics, designed and used within individual clinical labs, haven’t so far been subject to the agency’s premarket approval process. They are regulated by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services through the 1988 Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA), but FDA has argued that this oversight only makes sure tests are performed properly, and doesn’t review the underlying validity of the answers the tests give. The agency notified Congress in 2014 that it plans to exercise its authority to regulate lab-developed tests, but announced just before the November 2016 presidential election that it would hold off on finalizing its new standards and leave them to the next administration. FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, confirmed by the Senate last week, argued in a speech last year that with FDA resources scarce, “there’s no reason that the CLIA can’t be resourced to regulate more aspects of laboratory-developed tests, including more of the clinical considerations that FDA proposes to take on.” —Kelly Servick NIST stays level thanks to Senate boostersSenate appropriators largely prevailed in setting this year’s final budget for the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)—and that’s good news for researchers and advocates of advanced manufacturing.NIST is scheduled to receive $954 million in 2017, including $690 million for its research activities. That’s a $10 million dip from 2016 levels but some $89 million more than appropriators in the House had wanted to spend. However, neither body came close to meeting Obama’s request for $1.019 billion and $730 million, respectively.The Senate also had its way on supporting the National Network for Manufacturing Innovation, an Obama-era priority in which individual agencies fund large centers that attract significant amounts of private sector money as well. NIST’s final spending bill includes $20 million for its own contribution to the network and up to $5 million to coordinate the effort across the federal government. House appropriators had voted only for the coordination activities.Similarly, the Senate’s wishes prevailed for the Hollings Manufacturing Extension Partnership, giving NIST $130 million rather than the House level of $120 million. And congressional negotiators came down on the side of the Senate in providing $109 million for upgrading in-house research facilities, rather than the House’s proposal for only $50 million. The total includes $60 million for safety and technical improvements on a building doing radiation physics, some $20 million more than the Obama administration had requested. –Jeffrey Mervis OGphoto/iStockphoto By Science News StaffMay. 1, 2017 , 11:15 AM DOE research flat, future of ITER uncertain, but ARPA-E gainsTrump has proposed a massive budget cut next year for the Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) basic research wing, the Office of Science, but the rest of this fiscal year is looking relatively prosperous. In its omnibus bill, Congress holds spending in the Office of Science essentially flat, giving the United States’s single biggest funder of the physical sciences a 0.8% increase to $5.392 billion. That is just $8 million shy of what both the House and Senate had earlier proposed in their markups of the 2017 budget.The Office of Science supports six research programs, and there were winners and losers among them. On the plus side, advanced scientific computing research, which funds much of DOE’s supercomputing capabilities, gets a 4.2% increase to $647 million. High energy physics gets a boost of 3.8% to $825 million. Basic energy sciences, which funds work in chemistry, material science, and condensed matter physics and runs most of DOE’s large user facilities, gets a bump up of 1.2% to $1.872 billion. Nuclear physics gets a 0.8% raise to $622 million; biological and environmental research inches up 0.5% to $612 million. In contrast, the fusion energy sciences program sees its budget fall a whopping 13.2% to $380 million.The biggest question in the budget remains the United States’s contribution to ITER, the massive fusion experiment under construction near Cadarache in France. Congress has allotted $50 million for ITER, down from $125 million last year. That cut would come halfway through the fiscal year, which ends 30 September. As researchers have likely already spent that much, the cut would zero out the program for the rest of the year. However, the budget also allows DOE to “reprogram” up to an additional $50 million for the fusion project.”Basically, Congress has given the administration a dial and it can dial in any number between $50 million and $100 million,” says Thom Mason, director of Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee. DOE officials will turn the dial one way or the other once the Trump administration decides whether to stay in or abandon ITER, Mason says.That should become clear when the Trump administration releases the details of its proposed budget for fiscal year 2018, expected later this month. In its outline “skinny budget,” released on 16 March, the administration said that it plans to cut the Office of Science budget by $900 million. But given the current budget, Mason says he hopeful that Congress may not agree to that. “The fact that you see in Congress solid bipartisan support [for the Office of Science] does suggest that when the fiscal year 2018 budget gets resolved it will look significantly different from the [White House] proposal,” Mason says.Congress also appears to think more fondly of DOE’s Advance Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E), whose goal is to take the promising ideas from basic research and quickly develop them into fledgling technologies. The Trump administration has signaled that it wants to eliminate ARPA-E next year, and last week, DOE put a freeze on ARPA-E grants. However, for this year Congress would give ARPA-E a healthy 5.2% increase to $306 million. —Adrian ChoCorrection: This item originally noted DOE’s budget as $5.392 million instead of $5.392 billion. Congress has finally reached a deal on spending bills for the 2017 fiscal year, which ends on 30 September. House of Representatives and Senate leaders announced last night that they expect lawmakers to vote this week on an agreement that wraps together all 12 appropriations bills that fund federal operations. For the past 7 months, the government has been operating under a continuing resolution that froze 2017 spending at most agencies at 2016 levels and generally prevented them from starting new programs. The new deal allows agencies to operate normally within the constraints of the spending plans, assuming that President Donald Trump signs the legislation (as is expected). It also averts a shutdown of the government that would have occurred next weekend if Congress failed to act in time.Overall, the deal staves off major cuts for federal science agencies that Trump had requested last month. A few, including the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and NASA science programs, actually receive substantial increases.Below, the Science News staff provides some details: NASA gets 1.9% boost as appropriators ignore Trump’s requested cutsNASA fares relatively well in the spending deal, with a budget of $19.653 billion, up 1.9% from $19.285 billion last year. The agency’s Office of Science receives $5.764 billion, up 3.1% from $5.589 billion in 2016.Defying Trump administration proposals for 2017, the deal continues funding for earth science at 2016 levels: $1.921 billion. That includes $90 million for the Pre-Aerosol, Clouds, and Ocean Ecosystem satellite, which the White House has proposed eliminating in 2018; none of the three other missions singled out by the administration for cancellation next year are mentioned in the deal. The law also maintains financing for NASA’s Office of Education, which the administration has also sought to close in 2018, at its existing level of $100 million.Bolstered by the support of Representative John Culberson (R–TX), who oversees House science appropriations, planetary science saw its budget balloon by 13%, from $1.519 billion to $1.846 billion. NASA’s planned missions to Europa, Jupiter’s icy ocean moon, including a flyby and eventual lander, get fully into swing with $275 million. The deal also includes $408 million for the Mars 2020 rover, which will collect samples on the planet for eventual return to Earth for analysis, including support for a prototype helicopter to hitch along on the rover—provided adding that craft doesn’t delay launch. —Paul Voosencenter_img Smithsonian strikes out on biodiversity and telescope projects, but sees modest increases elsewhereThe bill would provide the Smithsonian Institution, which receives about two-thirds of its support from the federal government, with $863 million. That represents a $23 million, 2.7% increase for this collection of 19 museums, nine research institutions, and the National Zoo, but is $59 million below what Obama requested for 2017.Obama’s request included a call to almost triple support for a biodiversity initiative, to about $4.2 million, including funds for genomics, global Earth observatories, and microbial and conservation research. But the new bill provides just a modest $77,000 increase, to $1.53 million. And the bill does not include funding for a proposed $2 million Greenland Telescope.  However, the new bill does give the SmithsonianTropical Research Institute, the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, the National Museum of Natural History, and the National Zoo the modest 1% to 5% increases that Obama asked for: to $14.344 million, $4.171 million, $24.393 million, $49.205 million, and $27.252 million, respectively. —Elizabeth Pennisi NSF ordered to build three shipsCongress has told the National Science Foundation (NSF) to build three research ships—but hasn’t given it enough to money to pay for them all.The 2017 spending bill basically holds NSF’s funding steady—a $9 million bump to $7.472 billion. It keeps both the six research directorates and NSF’s education directorate at their combined 2016 totals, of $6.033 billion and $880 million, rejecting small hikes in each account requested by Obama. And it ignores NSF’s request for $43 million more in operating funds to build and move into a new headquarters building in northern Virginia, leaving officials in a quandary.The research funding marks a retreat from levels in a bill approved last summer by appropriators in the House, and holds to the figure in an earlier Senate bill. But House appropriators prevailed over their Senate counterparts in ordering NSF to launch a $15 million program for Hispanic college students, something that NSF says it’s already doing as part of a broader outreach to underrepresented minorities.The only NSF account that grows is for new large facilities. NSF had requested $193 million for three projects. Two are telescopes already under construction (the Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope in Hawaii and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope in Chile). The third project is two regional-class research vessels that NSF hopes to start building next year to upgrade its academic fleet.NSF had requested $106 million in 2017 to start building the two vessels, estimated to cost $127 million apiece. (NSF had originally planned on building three ships, but changed its mind after a National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine panel said two were sufficient.) House appropriators balked, zeroing out the project. But the Senate spending panel called for the original trio of vessels, and it won out in the end.The only problem is that congressional appropriators allocated only $15 million more than the $106 million NSF had requested for continued planning and the start of construction of two ships. That leaves NSF $38 million short, based on a per capita request of $53 million for each ship.Clare Reimers of Oregon State University in Corvallis, which is managing the construction project, says “The plan is for a staggered build with hulls two and three starting 1 and 2 years after hull one, respectively.” NSF officials declined to comment on how the new spending levels would affect those plans. “It is possible tough choices will need to be made,” says geophysicist Maria Zuber, the chair of the National Science Board, NSF’s oversight body.But Zuber, who is vice president for research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, adds that the board is keeping its fingers crossed. “We appreciate the support for NSF in this challenging budgetary time. And we hope Congress will follow up with a [fiscal year] 2018 budget that continues commitments of these important activities without incurring additional delays and costs.” —Jeffrey Mervis The big picture: A 5% rise in federal R&D this year could be good omen for 2018Overall federal spending on research and development (R&D) will grow by 5% under a fiscal 2017 budget deal expected to be approved by Congress this week, according to an analysis by the R&D Budget and Policy Program at AAAS in Washington, D.C. (publisher of ScienceInsider).Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Total spending on R&D will rise to $155.8 billion for the fiscal year that ends on 30 September, according to the analysis published yesterday. That number includes everything spent on basic and applied science as well as the development of new technologies and the construction of facilities. The split is $72.9 billion for civilian activities and $82.9 billion for military programs. Parsed another way, spending on basic research would grow by 4.1% to $34.9 billion, while funding for applied research would rise by 6.3% to $40.2 billion.Federal spending on R&D now amounts to 0.81% percent of the nation’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP). That percentage “represent[s] a small uptick on that metric, and the highest it has been since the year prior to sequestration, the across-the-board cuts levied on federal agencies in FY 2013,” note the authors of the analysis, Matthew Hourihan and David Parkes.The 2017 “funding outcomes are notable for two big reasons,” the authors note. First, mandatory spending caps imposed by a 2011 law left little room for spending increases at most federal agencies in 2017. But “even without much room to work with, legislators were able to overcome this constraint for many agencies. Perhaps more importantly, these [funding] decisions run directly counter to the Trump administration’s spending preferences for the current year. While one should always be cautious, it does provide some additional evidence beyond rhetoric that the current Congress is willing to push back against the Trump administration’s plans.”The 2017 outcome also “should give science advocates reason for optimism in light of the administration’s much tougher budget for [fiscal year] 2018,” they write. The president unveiled a “skinny” 2018 request in March that calls for deep cuts at many research agencies, and a full proposal is due out this month. “[T]his same Congress will begin writing the next round of spending bills in a matter of weeks,” the authors note. “Time will tell if the administration is able to wield more influence in the next funding cycle, given their lack of [influence] in the late stages of this cycle.” —David Malakoff EPA avoids major cutsAppropriators trimmed the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) budget by $81 million, or about 1%, to $8.06 billion. But they essentially rejected Trump administration requests for deeper cuts to select research and ecosystem protection programs, and removed many policy riders that Democrats in Congress had opposed.The agency’s science and technology programs, however, did take a $28 million, 3.8% cut, to $707 million.The Trump White House had identified some $230 million in EPA cuts it wanted Congress to make this year, including a $48 million cut to climate-related research, a $49 million cut to EPA’s Great Lakes Restoration Initiative, and $30 million cut to efforts to clean up contaminated superfund sites. Instead, Congress rejected those requests, keeping air and climate research flat at about $117 million, and the Great Lakes program flat at $300 million, while adding $7.5 million to superfund cleanups.Lawmakers stripped out many controversial policy riders, but kept several directing EPA to re-examine its greenhouse gas and wetlands protections policies. The bill also includes a controversial directive instructing EPA, together with the energy and agriculture departments, to “establish clear policies that reflect the carbon neutrality of biomass.” Declaring biomass—typically wood chips or other plant material—to be a fuel that does not add to net emissions of planet-warming carbon dioxide has been a controversial idea. Critics argue that favoring biomass as a fuel for producing electricity and heat could boost carbon emissions, not curb them, at least in the short run. And environmentalists fear promoting wood fuels could end up harming forests and other ecosystems. —David Malakoff At USDA, competitive grants program for basic science grows againLawmakers appear to be developing a soft spot for competitive grants for agricultural research. For the second year in a row, they have beefed up the budget of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA’s) Agriculture and Food Research Initiative (AFRI), one of the department’s main sources of funding for basic science in academia. The omnibus bill provides $375 million for AFRI, a 7.1% increase over the 2016 level.That means “there has been a 15% increase for AFRI over the past 2 years,” says Thomas Grumbly, president of the Supporters of Agricultural Research (SoAR) Foundation in Arlington, Virginia, which advocates for farm science funding. “Slowly but surely, people are recognizing the importance of this research program, even in a budget environment that is very tough.”At the same time, USDA’s Agricultural Research Service got a 2.3% increase, to $1.17 billion. Much of that funding is consumed by the department’s own extensive system of research laboratories, which often lean toward more applied research, or distributed to states based on a funding formula.Grumbly and other farm science advocates are now looking to build on the momentum as Congress begins to consider Trump’s 2018 budget request, and works to update the massive so-called farm bill that governs U.S. agricultural policy. An outline of Trump’s budget request released this past March was relatively kind to AFRI; although the plan called for slashing many other research budgets—or didn’t mention them at all—AFRI was highlighted in a single line that requested $350 million for the program. “We took that as a victory. … It’s one of the few things in the R&D area that they called out in a positive way,” Grumbly says. “Now, we can see if [Congress] can spruce that up a little.”SoAR is also working to insert “a serious science title in the next farm bill” that calls for doubling, to more than $700 million, the amount of money that USDA spends on competitively awarded research, Grumbly says. —David Malakoff How science fares in the U.S. budget deal Defying Trump, Congress gives NIH $2 billion boostFlouting the wishes of the Trump administration, Congress last night approved a $2 billion increase for NIH for fiscal year 2017—the second year in a row that the agency has grown by that amount after more than a decade of stagnant budgets. The Trump administration had proposed cutting NIH’s budget by about $1 billion this year, as part of a proposal to pay for defense spending increases by cutting domestic programs.The 6.2% bump to $34 billion includes $352 million provided under the 21st Century Cures Act, a measure to boost biomedical innovation that became law in December 2016. It created a 10-year pot of money—to be used for specific initiatives at NIH—that has a mandated funding stream that is not subject to the annual appropriations process. The inclusion of the 21st Century Cures funds means NIH’s base budget is only growing by $1.6 billion.All the same, advocates for biomedical research, who have been deeply worried by Trump’s budget plans for NIH, were thrilled. “It was worth the 7-month wait! We’re extremely grateful” to the leaders of the House and Senate committees that oversee NIH’s budget, says Jennifer Zeitzer, director of legislative relations for the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology in Bethesda, Maryland. A bill approved last summer in the Senate would have boosted NIH by $2 billion and a House bill would have raised the agency’s budget by $1.25 billion.The final omnibus bill, which funds NIH through 30 September, raises Alzheimer’s disease research by $400 million to $1.4 billion. Research on antibiotic resistance goes up $50 million. The brain-mapping initiative called Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies, launched by former President Barack Obama, receives $120 million, including $10 million from the Cures act. Another $160 million in new funding goes to the Precision Medicine Initiative (including $40 million from Cures for its 1-million person cohort study). And $300 million from Cures tagged for the National Cancer Institute is expected to fund former Vice President Joe Biden’s moonshot initiative.Biomedical research advocates are now girding for what could be a struggle over NIH’s budget for the 2018 fiscal year, which begins 1 October. The Trump administration wants to slash NIH spending by 18%, or $5.8 billion, in large part by cutting overhead payments to universities. —Jocelyn Kaiserlast_img read more

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Rising costs hamper mega–neutron beam facility

first_img By Edwin CartlidgeJul. 24, 2017 , 4:30 PM Rising costs hamper mega–neutron beam facility The world’s most powerful source of neutron beams will be less than half as powerful as planned when the facility begins scientific experiments in 2023. The European Spallation Source (ESS), under construction in Lund, Sweden, was designed to reach 5 megawatts (MW), but ballooning costs means that it will only achieve 2 MW in 6 years’ time—a reduced level that will likely limit the range of scientific studies it can carry out.Although the ESS council, the project’s main decision-making body, is considering plans that would boost power to 5 MW by 2025, some scientists fear that the facility will remain stuck at 2 MW for good. “There are some people with persuasive voices who say you don’t need 5 MW,” says Colin Carlile, a physicist at Uppsala University in Sweden and former ESS director. “But theirs are siren voices. It would be tragic if that happens.”Like x-rays, beams of neutrons are a way for scientists to explore the atomic structure of materials. But where x-rays scatter off the cloud of electrons surrounding an atom, neutrons scatter off atomic nuclei. That capability helps scientists, for example, to locate hydrogen, which, with only one electron, is a more elusive target for x-rays. Neutron beams can also differentiate between nuclei of different isotopes. And, because neutrons carry a spin, they can reveal the magnetic properties of the material in question. Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*) The European Spallation Source, under construction in Lund, Sweden, may not reach its design power of 5 megawatts.center_img Perry Nordeng/ESS Most neutron sources are nuclear reactors that generate neutrons through fission. But in recent years scientists have increasingly turned to spallation sources, in which an accelerated beam of protons breaks apart the nuclei of atoms in a solid target, stripping off neutrons that are then channeled into beams and directed toward instruments used to carry out experiments. A higher power beam leads to a greater flux of neutrons, enabling greater spatial and temporal resolution and the study of small samples, such as proteins.The ESS was proposed back in the late 1980s as a way to maintain Europe’s lead in this field, given planned 1=MW-caliber facilities in the United States and Japan. The imminent start of the ESS should also help counter growing worries about a “neutron drought” in Europe, as older neutron sources close. Building work on the ESS eventually began in 2014, after the project’s 15 partner countries agreed to foot the €1.84 billion construction bill. Plans at that point called for first neutrons in 2019, full 5-MW beam power for the first user experiments in 2023, with 16 of the instruments then available 2 years after that and the full complement of 22 instruments “a few years later,” according to ESS Director General John Womersley.Those deadlines are now slipping owing to the project’s “initial operations phase,” which runs from 2019 to 2025, costing at least €150 million more than a €850 million forecast in 2014. At a meeting in June, the ESS council began evaluating scenarios to bring these costs down. Cost-cutting options include postponing the purchase of equipment needed to boost proton power to 5 MW and slowing the speed at which instruments reach full specification.All of the scenarios envision the ESS operating with 2 MW of power in 2023 in order to guarantee what Womersley describes as “world leading performance” when experiments start up. But whereas one scenario delivers 5 MW by 2025, another foresees no rise in power by then. Similarly, although all the plans require 15 instruments to be installed by 2025, there are differences over how many of the additional seven will be constructed by that date. “We are retaining the project’s ultimate goals but changing the speed at which we achieve them,” he says.Michael Preuss, a materials scientist at the University of Manchester in the United Kingdom and chair of the ESS science advisory committee, describes the delay in full power as “a very sensible thing to do.” He would prefer to expand the number of instruments rather than boosting power early on. In any case, he maintains, improvements to the design of the machine’s moderators—devices needed to slow neutrons down to the speeds that make them useful for research—will yield a neutron flux that is “almost as high” at 2 MW as it would have been at 5 MW.Carlile says the project is going as he “would expect” for a large scientific facility built mainly with in-kind contributions. But he doesn’t think that progress with the moderators will compensate for the lower initial power, and he is worried that the cutbacks in power and instruments will be costly for European neutron science.The ESS council plans to decide on a preferred scenario before the end of this year so that member nations can then agree to their shares of that budget in 2018.last_img read more

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In a first, U.S. private sector employs nearly as many Ph.D.s as schools do

first_img 20 ’15 ’11 ’07 A changing career landscape Over the past 20 years, the portion of U.S. life and health sciences Ph.D.s employed as tenured and tenure track faculty has declined—while the number of Ph.D.s awarded in these fields has grown. ’97 10 By Katie LanginMar. 12, 2019 , 5:45 PM ’03 30 ’05 iStock.com/SolStock ’09 (Graphic) K. Langin/Science; (Data, top to bottom) Survey of Doctorate Recipients/NSF; Survey of Earned Doctorates/NSF ’99 Employment sector 5 Other ’05 ’15 15 thousand ’01 ’07 Public sectorcenter_img 0 ’17 ’01 ’03 Private sector ’13 ’97 ’11 ’13 In a first, U.S. private sector employs nearly as many Ph.D.s as schools do 40 Educational institution, other ’09 ’17 0 ’99 % Ph.D.s awarded 10 The job market for U.S. science and engineering Ph.D.s is about to pass a long-anticipated milestone. For decades, educational institutions have been the largest employer of Ph.D.s. In 1997, for instance, they eclipsed private sector employment by 11 percentage points, according to the U.S. National Science Foundation’s (NSF’s) biennial Survey of Doctorate Recipients. But the academic job market has not kept pace with the supply of graduates, and the equivalent data for 2017—released last month—reveals a very different picture: For the first time, private sector employment (42%) is now nearly on par with educational institutions (43%).The trend is particularly striking in the life and health sciences, the fields that award the most Ph.D.s. In 2017, only 23% of these Ph.D.s held a tenured or tenure track position in academia—a drop of 10 percentage points since 1997. Only math and the computer sciences have seen a larger drop, from 49% to 33%. Those 20-year shifts outpace changes in psychology and the social sciences (35% to 30%), engineering (23% to 16%), and the physical and earth sciences (22% to 19%). Educational institution, tenured and tenure track The numbers understate the impact on today’s academic job seekers, says Paula Stephan, a labor economist at Georgia State University in Atlanta who studies the scientific workforce. That’s because NSF’s data include all U.S.-trained Ph.D.s under 76 years of age who are employed full time in the United States. Newer cohorts are less likely to secure the tenure track position that many covet, Stephan says. “We’re in a system where … lots of really smart people are going to get faculty jobs and lots of really smart people aren’t,” adds Gary McDowell, executive director of Future of Research, a nonprofit organization in San Francisco, California, that advocates on behalf of early-career researchers.Some universities are beginning to adapt to this reality by collecting data on the career outcomes of their own Ph.D. graduates, which can vary significantly between institutions. This more granular data can help universities improve programming for current students and guide prospective attendees. For example, when the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), found that many of its students go on to work at biotech companies, it began to expose students to those careers earlier by offering internships, networking opportunities, and other hands-on experiences, says Elizabeth Watkins, dean of UCSF’s graduate division. More broadly, she says, “We owe transparency to our prospective students. … It’s truth in advertising.”Watkins is the co-leader of the Coalition for Next Generation Life Science—a group of institutions committed to collecting and disseminating data on Ph.D.s and postdocs using agreed-on standards, announced in 2017. So far this year, the 10 founding institutions have released data online about the career outcomes of their Ph.D. recipients. (Despite the coalition’s name, it tracks careers outside the life sciences, too.) Twenty-five more institutions are set to release their data by the end of next year, with data on postdocs’ career outcomes to follow.“It’s a huge first step—huge,” says Stephan, who isn’t involved in the coalition but has advocated for such a data collection initiative for decades. “It’s like 25 years too late … but it’s wonderful.”Institution-level data can be “very enlightening for a lot of early-career folks,” McDowell agrees. “You’re always surrounded in academia by people who have made it as academics; [but] you never see” the people who left, so it’s hard to appreciate how numerous they are.The data also serve as “a reality check” for faculty members who otherwise still assume that tenure track positions are the standard path for today’s trainees, says Reinhart Reithmeier, director of professional development and alumni engagement at the University of Toronto’s Institute of Medical Science in Canada. He spearheaded a similar initiative to collect data on Ph.D. recipients at his institution, which he and his colleagues published in PLOS ONE in January.Given how few young scholars are securing tenure track positions, it’s clear that the traditional apprenticeship model, as Reithmeier describes it—“I’m a successful scientist; just do what I did and you’ll be successful, too”—is outdated, he says. He now teaches a professional development course for graduate students—helping them develop transferable skills such as communication and giving them tips for searching and applying for jobs.Barbara Knuth, dean of the Graduate School at Cornell University, which was a founding member of the coalition, has noticed some faculty members aren’t interested in mentoring students who don’t want to pursue an academic career path. She calls the attitude a “pernicious cultural problem” but says it persists mainly among faculty who haven’t seen data on recent graduates.Watkins is now working to convince more universities to collect similar data. To encourage them, she and her UCSF colleagues put together a “toolkit” for other institutions and posted it on the bioRxiv preprint server last month. “We hoped that people could learn from all of our missteps and mistakes,” she says. “The more we know about where our students are going, the more we can think about whether we are … preparing them for those careers.”last_img read more

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Top stories: Warming worsens inequality, a brave new ‘overworld,’ and a foreign ties fiasco

first_img Global warming may boost economic inequalityOver the past half-century, climate change has been blamed for heat waves, flooding, and rising seas. Now, researchers say warmer temperatures are widening the chasm separating richer and poorer countries, effectively boosting the economies of many wealthy polluters while dampening growth in much of the developing world. As a result, inequality between the haves and have-nots is already 25% greater than it would be in a cooler world, the paper asserts.Into the overworld: Modified spy plane to see whether towering storms pose new threat to ozone layerSign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)NASA is preparing a former spy plane to soar into the lower stratosphere, some 18 kilometers up, in search of a potential new threat to the ozone layer above the U.S. Great Plains. There, scientists suspect, towering summer thunderstorms are lofting water and pollutants high into the stratosphere, where they can catalyze ozone destruction. And researchers worry the problem could worsen as the planet warms.Exclusive: Major U.S. cancer center ousts ‘Asian’ researchers after NIH flags their foreign tiesThe MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, Texas, has ousted three senior researchers after the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland, said they had committed potentially “serious” violations of agency rules on peer-review confidentiality and the disclosure of foreign ties. The new developments are linked to a sweeping NIH effort to address U.S. government fears that foreign nations, particularly China, are taking unfair advantage of federally funded research.Just 10% of U.S. plastic gets recycled. A new kind of plastic could change thatMost plastics have a chemical history that makes starting a new life a challenge. The dyes and flame retardants that make them perfect for say, a couch cushion or a bottle of detergent, make them tough to transform into a desirable end product—one of the reasons just 10% of plastic in the United States gets recycled. Now, researchers have created a plastic with a special chemical bond that helps it separate out from those additives, turning it back into a pure, valuable product that can be reused again and again.Emperor penguins flee unsteady ice after ‘unprecedented’ failure to breedAntarctica’s charismatic emperor penguins are thought to be particularly vulnerable to climate change, because warming waters are melting the sea ice where they live and breed. Now, the penguins have abandoned one of their biggest colonies after breeding pairs there failed to raise almost any new chicks in 3 years. Although the move cannot directly be attributed to climate change, researchers say it is an ominous sign of things to come for the largest of penguin species. (left to right): NARAYAN MAHARJAN/PACIFIC PRESS/LIGHTROCKET/GETTY IMAGES; SANTIAGO BORJA; HOUSTON CHRONICLE By Alex FoxApr. 26, 2019 , 11:30 AMcenter_img Top stories: Warming worsens inequality, a brave new ‘overworld,’ and a foreign ties fiascolast_img read more

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Candreva: ‘Very important win’

first_imgAntonio Candreva was pleased Inter grabbed three “very important” points at Brescia as his side continue their title challenge this season. Inter moved top of Serie A last night with a 2-1 win at Brescia, and Candreva took to social media to show his satisfaction with the result. “Three very important points. Let’s go on like this, guys!” he posted on his Instagram profile after the match. Juventus host Genoa tonight and the Nerazzurri will only stay at the summit if the Old Lady slip up against Thiago Motta’s troops. The 32-year-old has established himself in Antonio Conte’s squad this term, scoring three goals in 11 appearances. Watch Serie A live in the UK on Premier Sports for just £11.99 per month including live LaLiga, Eredivisie, Scottish Cup Football and more. Visit: https://subscribe.premiersports.tv/ Tre punti importantissimi. Avanti così ragazzi! #BresciaInter @inter #ForzaInter View this post on Instagram A post shared by Antonio Candreva (@antoniocandreva) on Oct 29, 2019 at 3:18pm PDTlast_img read more

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A Long Rally Ahead

first_imgFor Indian badminton, it is one of the best occasions in recent times to raise a toast. For Saina Nehwal, personally, it has been three great weeks of consistent performance. Basically there are three aspects that go into the making a badminton star like in most other sports-technical, physical and,For Indian badminton, it is one of the best occasions in recent times to raise a toast. For Saina Nehwal, personally, it has been three great weeks of consistent performance. Basically there are three aspects that go into the making a badminton star like in most other sports-technical, physical and mental. Abundance of all three attributes is vital to be among the best in the world. She has it all. That is the major difference between her and the other Indian girls. Most often, they have just two of these qualities.Saina is exceptional. She is technically sound, physically fit and mentally strong which gives her an edge over others. Another great quality is her self-belief and ‘never-say-die’ attitude. She does not give up easily even when the odds are against her. In a sport like badminton, her performances are all the more creditable since the game is physically so demanding.Personally, I have a very high regard for Indian sportswomen who excel at the highest level since they face a lot more challenges compared to men because of the nature of our society. This is more so during the early phase of their career and the parents have to make a lot of sacrifices to travel with them for their practice sessions well as tournaments.Saina is exceptional. She is technically sound, physically fit and mentally strong, which gives her an edge over others. As a player Saina has improved consistently over a period of time. She has started depending mainly on her low serves which straightaway gives her an advantage to go on the offensive. Also at times she gets a quick point when the opponents make an error on the service return itself. This strategy looks easy but is difficult to implement since one can easily get caught if the player is not fast enough to respond to a good return of serve. She is extremely confident at the net while dribbling which gives her a lot of weak mid-court returns. Again this is easier said than done. It needs hours and hours of tireless practice to master the dribble. She has a good hit as well which is so important to finish a rally and score a point. She is prepared to wait for the right opportunities to finish the rally. Sometimes it could present itself in the second or third stroke itself and on many occasions one might have to wait longer. This requires patience and a lot of self confidence in stroke-making. Obviously Saina has both these qualities which are helping her win matches.Even though she is a complete player, there is scope for her to work on her forehand side, especially from the back court. At times she is slow to reach the net when the opponents play a really sharp drop on her backhand. She can work on her defence as well. Generally there is drift in most stadia across the world and Indians are always comfortable playing against the wind as it is easy to control your shots. I am sure it is the same with Saina as well. However, she would do well to practice a little more “playing with the wind” as well. This way you need not necessarily always concede a game while “playing with the wind”.advertisementSaina is already a big star at such a young age. It will bring a lot of media attention. What is important is not to get carried away. It is equally important to realise that she has a long career ahead of her and a lot more tournaments to win. From whatever little I know of Saina, I am sure, she will stay focused and it is only a matter of time before she becomes World No. 1.Full credit to her coach Pullela Gopichand for the way he has planned and executed her progress as well as the support team of the physiotherapist and physical trainer who, as always, work quietly behind the scenes.Saina, you have done all of us proud, you have the ability to go all the way. In this format it will not be possible to win every tournament you enter. What is critical is choosing your tournaments carefully and resting enough between them to make sure that you remain in peak condition all the time and injury-free. This is just the beginning. Do not worry about the odd loss here and there. Keep it up. The entire country is behind you.The writer is a former All England Badminton championadvertisementlast_img read more

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IPL 5 teams

first_imgThis year the Cricket Fest will witness 9 teams vie for the top honours. Here’s a list off all the players who will feature in this mega cricketing extravaganza.Team Chennai They are the defending champions and would be looking to retain the crown. If they do it in IPL five, this would be the third time in a row from them.Batsmen: Suresh Raina, George Bailey, Murali Vijay, Faf du Plessis, Subramaniam Badrinath, Kuthethurshri Vasudevadas, Michael Hussey, Anirudha Srikkanth, Abhinav MukundAll-rounders: Dwayne Bravo, Scott Styris, Albie Morkel, Ravindra Jadeja, Ganapathi VigneshWicketkeepers: Mahendra Singh Dhoni (Captain), Wriddhiman SahaBowlers: Doug Bollinger, Sudeep Tyagi, Yo Mahesh, Joginder Sharma, Shadab Jakati, Ben Hilfenhaus, Suraj Randiv, Nuwan Kulasekara, Ravichandran AshwinTeam Hyderabad They won the title in 2009 and would be hoping to come good this season.Batsmen: Bharat Chipli, Cameron White, Shikhar Dhawan, Ishank Jaggi, JP Duminy, Arjun Yadav, Sunny Sohal, Dwaraka Ravi Teja, Darren Bravo, Daniel Harris, Chris Lynn, Tanmay Mishra*, Tanmay Srivastava, Abhishek Jhunjhunwala, Akshath ReddyAll-rounders: Daniel Christian, Biplab Samantray, Ashish Reddy, Syed QuadriWicketkeepers: Kumar Sangakkara (Captain), Parthiv Patel, Kedar DevdharBowlers: Ankit Sharma, Dale Steyn, Anand Rajan, Rusty Theron, Manpreet Gony, Amit Mishra, TP Sudhindra, Akash Bhandari, Veer Pratap Singh, Sneha KishoreTeam RajasthanThey were the underdogs in the first season, but ended up winning the title. Expect them to come up with a fine show in IPL 5.Batsmen: Rahul Dravid (Captain), Ashok Menaria, Ajinkya Rahane, Aakash Chopra, Faiz Fazal, Swapnil Asnodkar, Brad Hodge, Owais Shah, Dinesh Salunkhe, Ankeet ChavanAll-rounders: Abhishek Raut, Paul Collingwood, Johan Botha, Shane Watson, Stuart Binny, Kevon Cooper, Ajit ChandilaWicket Keepers: Pinal Shah, Amit Paunikar, Dishant Yagnik, Dinesh Chandimal, Shreevats GoswamiBowlers: Sumit Narwal, Amit Singh, Deepak Chahar, Shaun Tait, Siddharth Trivedi, Nayan Doshi, Samad Fallah, Aditya Dole, Pankaj Singh, Brad Hogg, Sreesanth, Gajendra SinghadvertisementTeam DelhiThey have always been regarded as tough contenders. Under Virender Sehwag they would be looking to drive home the point that they are no pushovers.Batsmen: Virender Sehwag (Captain), Aaron Finch, Unmukt Chand, David Warner, Venugopal Rao, Kevin Pietersen, Mahela Jayawardene, Ross Taylor, Gulam Bodi, Robin Bist, Tejashwi Yadav, Manpreet Juneja, Kuldeep Raval Prashant NaikAll-rounders: Yogesh Nagar, Irfan Pathan, Roelof van der Merwe, Andre Russell, Glenn Maxwell, Pawan NegiWicketkeepers: Naman Ojha, Puneet BishtBowlers: Ajit Agarkar, Aavishkar Salvi, Morn Morkel, Varun Aaron, Umesh Yadav, Shahbaz Nadeem, Doug Bracewell, Vikas Mishra, Zafir PatelTeam PunjabWith Adam Gilchrist at the helm, the Punjab team have the killer instinct needed to win the tournament.Batsmen: Mandeep Singh, Paul Valthaty, Shaun Marsh, David Hussey, David Miller, Paras Dogra, Sunny Singh, Siddharth Chitnis, Gurkeerat SinghAll-rounders: Abhishek Nayar, Dimitri Mascarenhas, Rajagopal Satish, Bipul Sharma, Azhar Mahmood, James FaulknerWicketkeepers: Adam Gilchrist (Captain), Nitin SainiBowlers: Harmeet Singh, Praveen Kumar, Piyush Chawla, Bhargav Bhatt, Ryan Harris, Shalabh Srivastava, Vikramjeet Malik, Stuart Broad, Ramesh Powar, Love Ablish, Amit Yadav, Parvinder AwanaTeam KolkataKolkata performed wellunder Gautam Gambhir in IPL 4 and would be looking to do well this year too.Batsmen: Gautam Gambhir (Captain), Manoj Tiwary, Eoin Morgan, Debabrata Das All-rounders: Jacques Kallis, Laxmi Ratan Shukla, Rajat Bhatia, Ryan ten Doeschate, Yusuf Pathan, Shakib Al Hasan, Chirag JaniWicketkeepers: Brad Haddin, Manvinder Bisla, Brendon McCullum, Sanju SamsonBowlers: Sarabjit Ladda, James Pattinson, Shami Ahmed, Pradeep Sangwan, Iqbal Abdulla, Lakshmipathy Balaji, Brett Lee, Jaydev Unadkat, Sunil Narine, Marchant de Lange, Iresh SaxenaTeam MumbaiThey have always been a balanced side under the leadership of Master Blaster Sachin Tendulkar. This year too they will stake their claim for the crown.Batsmen: Sachin Tendulkar (Captain), Tirumalasetti Suman, Aiden Blizzard, Ambati Rayudu, Rohit Sharma, Suryakumar Yadav, Herschelle Gibbs, Richard Levi, Jaydev Shah, Apoorv WankhadeAll-rounders: Kieron Pollard, James Franklin, Thisara Perera, Mitchell Johnson, Amitoze Singh, Sujit NayakWicketkeepers: Aditya Tare, Davy Jacobs, Dinesh Karthik, Sushant MaratheBowlers: Harbhajan Singh, Munaf Patel, Abu Nechim, Dhawal Kulkarni, Yuzvendra Chahal, Pawan Suyal, Lasith Malinga, Pragyan Ojha, R. P. Singh, Clint McKay, Robin Peterson, Rahul ShuklaTeam BangaloreThey were the finalists in the 2009 and 2011 edition and will be looking to bag the title this year.Batsmen: Mohammad Kaif, Cheteshwar Pujara, Arun Karthik, Luke Pomersbach, Mayank Agarwal, Saurabh Tiwary, Virat Kohli, Rilee Rossouw, Vijay ZolAll-rounders: Daniel Vettori (Captain), Asad Pathan, Tillakaratne Dilshan, Chris Gayle, Andrew McDonald, Raju Bhatkal, Karun Nair, S ThiagarajanWicketkeepers: AB de Villiers, Muralidharen GautamBowlers: Syed Mohammad, Abhimanyu Mithun, Zaheer Khan, Sreenath Aravind, Dirk Nannes, Charl Langeveldt, Muttiah Muralitharan, Vinay Kumar, Harshal Patel, KP Appanna, Abrar Kazi, Ryan NinanTeam PuneYuvraj Singh, who led Pune last year, is undergoing treatment for lung cancer. In his absence Sourav Ganguly will be leading the team. Aussie skipper Michael Clarke is an added attraction in their ranks.Batsmen: Sourav Ganguly (Captain), Michael Clarke, Mohnish Mishra, Graeme Smith, Callum Ferguson, Mithun Manhas, Manish Pandey, Tamim Iqbal, Marlon Samuels, Dheeraj Jadhav, Harshad Khadiwale, Anustup Majumdar, Harpreet SinghAll-rounders: Yuvraj Singh (Undergoing treatment for lung cancer), Nathan McCullum, Jesse Ryder, Angelo Mathews, Luke Wright, Steve Smith, Raiphi GomezWicketkeepers: Robin Uthappa, Mahesh Rawat, Eklavya DwivediBowlers: Rahul Sharma, Alfonso Thomas, Murali Kartik, Ashish Nehra, Kamran Khan, Wayne Parnell, Shrikant Wagh, Ashok Dinda, Ali Murtaza, Sachin Rana, Bhuvneshwar Kumar, Krishnakant Upadhyayadvertisementlast_img read more

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Five pillars of fitness that will change your life

first_imgHitting 30 signals a change in your physiology. While genes play a role, recent research has indicated that changing your diet and how you exercise can make a huge difference to the way you age. If you can’t remember the last time you exercised (perhaps at your school sports day?) and never paid attention to what’s on your fork, read on to find out the whys and hows from top-of-the-line experts. Get up and get moving! Weigh & Measure YourselfWHY: You need to set a goal, and later, track your progress. “Your kilos, inches as well as fat percentage (you can get it measured at a good gym) determines your overall health and how far or near you are to the mark,” explains Prevention advisor and Reebok master trainer Nisha Varma, New Delhi. HOW: “Step on the scale a week after your periods, preferably before breakfast,” says Varma. Remember, your weight fluctuates through the day and month-there can be as much as a 2 to 2.5 kg variation. Measure the problem areas-chest, your waist (around the belly button), the broadest part of your hips, thigh and upper arm-at the outset and track the changes monthly after you begin your programme. “With the right regimen, you’ll notice inch loss in a month’s time, and a substantial drop in kilos after three months,” says Varma. WHAT RESEARCH SHOWS: A dozen studies tracking over 16,000 dieters provide irrefutable evidence that the weighing scale is one of the most effective tools for losing weight and stopping stealthy kilos from adding on. In fact, a whopping 75% of members (both men and women) of the National Weight Control Registry (in the US), who have lost at least 13 kg and kept it off, weigh themselves at least once a week. IT’S GOOD TO KNOW: Your inches around the middle matter. If you’re an apple (with fat centred around the waist), you carry a greater risk of diabetes and heart disease than pears (those with fat around the hips). Aim to keep your waistline below 32 inches. BIG BONUS: Tracking your weight can actually boost your mood by giving you a sense of control.2Include CardioWHY: It’s important to keep your body moving. Your heart (also a muscle) gets its much-needed workout when you move. Cardiovascular exercise, also known as aerobic exercise, gets your heart rate up, makes it stronger, increases blood circulation and burns calories. Research is pouring in on the benefits of cardio-from improving heart health and tackling diabetes to slashing cancer risk. Walking, jogging, cycling, skipping and swimming are all forms of aerobic exercise. “If you haven’t exercised before, start with walking-it comes naturally and doesn’t require any skill,” says Varma. HOW: Wear comfortable walking shoes and start off. Begin at a moderate pace (12 to 13 minutes to a km) and in a week’s time, walk briskly (9 to 10 minutes to a km). Depending on your weight-loss goal, aim to do 30 minutes to an hour of cardio daily. WHAT RESEARCH SHOWS: Exercise may help turn back the clock, say University of Toronto researchers, based on 69 studies. Adults who did about an hour of moderate activity (like walking or bicycling) most days of the week from their middle years into their 80s and 90s kept their hearts and lungs as healthy as those of less active folks up to 12 years their junior; plus, their chances of needing assisted living dropped to those of someone a decade younger. IT’S GOOD TO KNOW: If you have an existing knee condition, try the crosstrainer or cycling which cause much less impact on your joints. BIG BONUS: “The flush on your skin- that can beat the best of make-up. The effect of a single workout stays on for 24 hours on your skin and a sustained effort stays forever,” adds Varma. Result: beautiful, glowing skin, longer.3Add WeightsWHY: To stop midlife fat spread. “You lose 2.5 kg of muscle mass every decade beginning age 25 and 1% bone mass every year after age 35,” says Mumbaibased Prevention advisor and Reebok master trainer Vinata Shetty. “Strength training helps to arrest or at least slow that process.” Stronger muscles also improve balance, so you cut your risk of falls in old age. Plus, building muscles fires up your metabolism-your body continues burning calories even whenof muscle burns 40 calories a day as opposed to nine calories for a pound of fat. This is because muscle, unlike fat, is an active tissue that needs calories to survive,” says Shetty. Besides, strength training gives you that toned, firm and sleek physique. Worried that you’ll look like a WWE wrestler? Don’t be. Women don’t have a guy’s level of testosterone required to bulk up. HOW: You don’t have to spend too much time pumping iron to reap the benefits. “A 45 to 60 minute session twice a week is good,” says Shetty. Just make sure your progamme targets the whole body: aim eight to 12 exercises per session. “When you start the regimen, use light weights (depending on your capacity, 1 to 3 kg) and attempt multiple reps (16 to 20) to build endurance, later challenge your body with heavier weights (4 kg upwards) with fewer reps (8 to 12) to build stronger muscles,” adds Shetty. WHAT RESEARCH SHOWS: A new study published in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine found that the combination of aerobic exercise and weight training is significantly better for controlling blood sugar than either alone. In the study, the combo exercisers had a nearly 1% lower HbA1C reading (blood sugar reading) after a 22-week exercise programme. This drop actually translates to a 15 to 20% decrease in heart attack and stroke risk and a 25 to 40% lower risk of diabetes-related eye or kidney disease. How? Resistance training creates more muscle tissue and insulin receptors, improving the absorption of glucose into muscles. As your !STRENGTH TRAIN TO BUILD MUSCLES AND FIRE UP YOUR ME TA BO LISM muscles soak up the glucose, your pancreas can breathe a sigh of relief. IT’S GOOD TO KNOW: Muscle weighs more than fat. So when you strengthtrain, you may notice that you have put on a few kilos. But because muscle is more dense than fat, it takes up less space, making you look lean, helping you fit into your clothes like a dream. BIG BONUS: “You can dig into your favourite chocolate mousse or butterscotch ice cream and get away with it with your revved-up metabolism,” quips Shetty. In fact, a Tufts University study shows people who strength-trained for 12 weeks and increased their muscle mass by just 3 pounds (1.3 kg) could eat 15% more calories-that’s about 300 calories a day for an average woman-without gaining an ounce.4Do Functional TrainingWHY: Because being fit means to be able to sail through your daily activities. Functional training does exactly that. Rather than focussing on just one or two muscles per exercise as in a bicep curl or leg extension for your quads, you work many muscles together-the way you do in real life. “Also, since functional training is a great deal about the right posture, you are able to strengthen your core-the abdominal area that you use to perform a range of movements- and make it flexible,” says Delhi-based Pilates expert Vesna Jacob. The result: everyday tasks are easier, you have an improved balance, stability and strength-and you shape up quickly. HOW: This fitness routine includes BOSU ball-based exercises, stability ball exercises, different variations of plank, among others. Often, you are required to perform moves in unstable conditions to challenge your body. WHAT RESEARCH SHOWS: According to research in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, those enrolled in a functional training programme had 58% greater increase in strength over those in the fixed form group (those who did either strength or cardio). IT’S GOOD TO KNOW: “Focus on the quality of the movement, rather than quantity,” says Jacob. With the wrong posture, your workout may just backfire, so take the help of a good trainer. BIG BONUS: “Functional training will improve your posture, make you look taller (you will not slouch) by at least an inch and a half, more confident and ready to take on the world,” says Jacob.5Mind Your DietWHY: “From early adulthood to late middle age, your metabolic rates fall by an average of 10%, a result of a sedentary lifestyle, plus a decline in cellular activity,” explains Kolkata-based nutritionist Heena Nafis. So your food intake must be adjusted to the changed basal metabolic rate (BMR). HOW: “If you don’t have weight issues, aim for 1600 kcals a day and fill up on water-at least 2.5 to 3 litres daily,” advises Nafis. Follow the small frequent meals principle, have a balanced diet with five servings of fresh fruits and veggies, have calcium-rich foods like milk and yoghurt and consume good fats (Omega-3s and 6 found in walnuts, almonds, olive oil, canola oil, fatty fish). “Don’t work out on an empty stomach- fuel yourself with an apple, a banana or a few dates before you hit the gym, sip water during your workout and load up on protein-egg and toast, a chicken sandwich or paneer-stuffed roti-after your training,” says Nafis. WHAT RESEARCH SHOWS: Fats are an integral part of a healthy diet. Omega-3 is especially beneficial. A recent Harvard School of Public Health study found that absence of Omega-3 in the diet is responsible for up to 96,000 premature deaths in the US. What’s more, preliminary research also shows that this fatty acid may help you lose weight by boosting metabolism. IT’S GOOD TO KNOW: Pair your post-work out protein with complex carb-rich foods. This is because carbs are needed to spike the insulin level that helps the cells to absorb amino acids necessary for muscle rebuilding. BIG BONUS: A domino effect: you will set an example for healthy eating for your entire family. advertisementadvertisementadvertisementlast_img read more

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